MovableType 1.x

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MovableType 1.x

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MT-1.1.tar.gz
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Re: MovableType 1.x

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MT-1.2.tar.gz
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Re: MovableType 1.x

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MT-1.31.tar.gz
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Re: MovableType 1.x

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MT-1.4.tar.gz
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Re: MovableType 1.x

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Movable Type Installation Instructions

NAME
SYNOPSIS
REQUIREMENTS
UPGRADING
INSTALLATION
Installing the Movable Type application
Checking for Required Modules
Setting up your Blog Directories
Running Movable Type
ADDITIONAL NOTES
Setting Permissions on Unix

NAME

mtinstall - Movable Type Installation/Upgrading

SYNOPSIS

This document describes the process of installing the Movable Type system on your machine, or upgrading to a newer version of Movable Type.

REQUIREMENTS

Movable Type requires the following:

An account on a webserver that allows you to run custom CGI scripts.

perl, version 5.005_3 or greater

Two Perl modules that you may need to install: HTML::Template and Image::Size.

An FTP program to upload the necessary files to your webserver.

There is a good chance that the two required Perl modules are already installed on your webserver, so you will not need to install them yourself. Don't worry about this now; instructions for determining whether you have these modules installed is below, in Checking for Required Modules. You will need to perform the first set of steps (Installing the Movable Type application) first.

UPGRADING

If you have already installed the previous version of Movable Type (1.0), you do not need to perform a complete installation. Instead, follow these steps:

Download the upgrade distribution file (rather than the full distribution).

Unpack the .tar.gz archive.

Open an FTP connection to your webserver, and open the directory where you installed Movable Type.

Upload all of the files and directories in the archive to your webserver, replacing any older copies.

Make sure that you upload all of the files in ASCII mode, except for any images, which should be uploaded in binary.

NOTE: if you have made changes to any of the files that you are replacing, you will need to mark the files that have changed, and make the same changes to the new versions. This only applies if the changes you made have not been incorporated into the new Movable Type release in some form, of course. If you are unsure whether you need to redo a change you have made to one of the Movable Type files, ask your question on the Support Forum (http://www.movabletype.org/support/ib3/ikonboard.cgi).

Ensure that the permissions of each of the CGI scripts (all files ending in the extension .cgi) are set to 755.

This means that the owner should have read, write, and execute permissions, and that group and other should have read and execute permissions (but not write permissions).

That's it!

INSTALLATION

Installing the Movable Type application

Ensure that you meet all of the requirements as stated above.

The files mt.cgi, mt-comments.cgi, mt-add-notify.cgi, mt-load.cgi, mt-check.cgi, and mt-import.cgi are Perl scripts. The first line of each of these files must contain the path to Perl on your webserver; typically this is #!/usr/bin/perl. You may need to change this if Perl is at a different location on your webserver, such as /usr/local/bin/perl. If you do need to change the setting, take care not to remove the -w at the end of the first line in each file; this setting turns on warnings in Perl, and it is important that it be left on.

To determine the location of Perl on your webserver, take a look at the support pages for your hosting service. Alternatively, if you have a shell (command line) account, and are familiar using it, you can log in to that account that type:

$ whereis perl

This will give you the location(s) of Perl on your system.

Open your FTP program, and open an FTP connection to your webserver.

Choose where on your webserver you would like to install Movable Type. This is the location that you will use (from your web browser) when using the Movable Type system; note that it is not necessarily where you will keep your blog(s).

Create a new directory for the Movable Types files, if necessary; then open that directory.

Find the file mt.cfg in the Movable Type folder that you downloaded. Open the file mt.cfg in a text editor. You need to change the line starting with CGIPath to point to the correct URL where you are planning to install Movable Type (corresponding to the location you chose in Step 4). For example, if you are installing Movable Type so that it will be located at http://www.your-site.com/movabletype/, you would change the CGIPath line to

CGIPath http://www.your-site.com/movabletype/

After changing that line, save the file and exit the editor.

Upload all of the files to your webserver. NOTE: be careful when doing this, as certain files must be uploaded in ASCII mode, whereas others must be uploaded in binary mode:

ASCII mode: docs, lib, mt.cfg, styles.css, tmpl, and all of the CGI scripts (mt.cgi, etc.).

Binary mode: images.

Set the permissions (CHMOD) of the files mt.cgi, mt-comments.cgi, mt-add-notify.cgi, mt-check.cgi, mt-load.cgi, and mt-import.cgi to 755. If your FTP client sets permissions using a graphical display, make sure that all users in the list have Execute and Read permissions. Only the Owner should have Write permissions. NOTE: if you are using the Unix shell to set permissions, see Setting Permissions on Unix (below).
Create a new directory called db. Set the permissions (CHMOD) of this directory db to 777. If your FTP client uses a graphical display, 777 means that all users in the list should have Read, Write, and Execute permissions.

NOTE: it is advisable from a security standpoint to create the db directory outside of your web-accessible directories. This prevents web browsers from seeing any of your database content.

If your hosted account has a non-web-accessible directory, it is more secure to place your db directory outside of the web-accessible area. For example, many hosted accounts have a home directory that is not web-accessible, then a a public_html directory that is the root of your web-accessible area. Movable Type supports placing your db directory in a non-web-accessible area.

To do this, do not create your db directory in the same directory in which you installed Movable Type; instead, create the db directory somewhere outside of the web-accessible area, and set the permissions to 777, as instructed above. You will then need to edit the mt.cfg file to provide the path to the new db area. Change the line

DataSource ./db

to instead read

DataSource /FULL/PATH/TO/DB

where /NEW/PATH/TO/DB is replaced by the full filesystem path to the db directory you just created. For example, if you create the directory at /home/melody/db, the above line would read

DataSource /home/melody/db

Then save and re-upload the mt.cfg file.

Open your web browser and point it at the URL for mt-load.cgi on your site. For example, if your site is http://www.your-site.com/, and you uploaded the Movable Type files into the /mt directory, you'd type http://www.your-site.com/mt/mt-load.cgi.

mt-load.cgi is a Perl script that loads initialization data into the Movable Type databases: an initial author, a blog, and some starter templates. If you get a 500 Internal Server Error when running this script, first check that you set the permissions to 755 (see above for what this means), and that you uploaded the file in ASCII mode. If these suggestions don't help, refer to the Troubleshooting section of the manual.

If successful, mt-load.cgi will report its success. If unsuccessful, it will report the error that occurred. This error could be due to insufficient permissions on the db directory, or the non-existence of that directory. See Step 6 (above) to determine whether you set the permissions correctly.

VERY IMPORTANT SECURITY NOTE:

Afer running mt-load.cgi, you should remove mt-load.cgi from the directory where you installed Movable Type. Failure to remove mt-load.cgi could enable someone else to create a blog in your Movable Type installation, and possibly gain access to your data. FAILURE TO DELETE mt-load.cgi INTRODUCES A MAJOR SECURITY RISK. So you should delete it now.

Checking for Required Modules

As mentioned above, it is very possible that your server already has the two required Perl modules, HTML::Template and Image::Size. To determine whether these modules are installed on your server--and to install them, if they are not already installed--follow the steps below. If you know that these modules are installed, you can skip to Setting up your Blog Directories.

Open your web browser and point it at the URL for mt-check.cgi on your site. For example, if your site is http://www.your-site.com/, and you uploaded the Movable Type files into the /mt directory, you'd type http://www.your-site.com/mt/mt-check.cgi.

mt-check.cgi is a Perl script that checks whether HTML::Template and Image::Size are installed on your server. If you get a 500 Internal Server Error when running this script, first check that you set the permissions to 755 (see above for what this means), and that you uploaded the file in ASCII mode. If these suggestions don't help, refer to the Troubleshooting section of the manual.

If the script runs successfully, it will say ``Checking for HTML::Template...'' and so on. If the script reports that your server has both HTML::Template and Image::Size installed, you can skip to Setting up your Blog Directories. Otherwise, continue with step 2.

Download the files for HTML::Template and/or Image::Size from these URLs. Of course, if your server already has one of these modules installed, you only need to install the module that is not yet installed.

http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-module/H ... 2.4.tar.gz

ftp://ftp.cpan.org/pub/CPAN/modules/by- ... 2.4.tar.gz

http://www.movabletype.org/downloads/Image/Size.pm

Unpack the HTML::Template archive. (If you downloaded the Image::Size file, you do not need to unpack anything). If you are on Unix, you can use gunzip and tar to unpack. For example:

$ gunzip HTML-Template-2.4.tar.gz
$ tar -xvf HTML-Template-2.4.tar

If you are on a Macintosh, Stuffit Expander will unpack these archives. If you are on Windows, EasyZip or winzip will do the job.

Connect to your FTP server, and open the directory into which you installed Movable Type. Create a new directory called extlib. Open that directory.

If you need to install HTML::Template:

In the extlib directory (see Step 4), create a new directory called HTML; open that directory; upload the file Template.pm from the HTML-Template archive into the new HTML directory. In other words, after uploading, Template.pm should be located at extlib/HTML/Template.pm.

Ignore the rest of the files in the archive.

If you need to install Image::Size:

In the extlib directory (see Step 4), create a new directory called Image; open that directory; upload the file Size.pm that you downloaded above into the new Image directory. In other words, after uploading, Size.pm should be located at extlib/Image/Size.pm.

Setting up your Blog Directories

The following steps will need to be repeated every time you create a new blog/journal in Movable Type. These steps set up the necessary permissions on your blog directories to allow Movable Type to access them.

You need to set up a directory where your weblog will be stored. In the case that this directory does not yet exist, create it; this directory does not have to be the same as that where you uploaded the files above (although it can be).

Set the permissions (CHMOD) of your weblog directory to 777. (See above for what this means.)

If you wish to store your archives in a separate directory than your main weblog (perhaps in a subdirectory of your main weblog), create that directory now, unless it already exists.

Set the permissions (CHMOD) of your archives directory to 777. (See above for what this means.)

Running Movable Type

Open your web browser and point it at the URL for mt.cgi on your site. mt.cgi is the main Movable Type application. For example, if your site is http://www.your-site.com/, and you installed the Movable Type application into the /mt directory, you'd type http://www.your-site.com/mt/mt.cgi to access Movable Type.

You should see the Movable Type login prompt. If you do not, check your permissions, and check that you uploaded the CGI scripts using ASCII mode. If neither of these helps, take a look at the Troubleshooting section of the manual.

Log in with the author name Melody and the password Nelson.

The first thing you should do is change your author name and password. To do so, click Edit your profile, then change the author name and password there.

The next thing to do is to configure your first blog. A blog called First Blog already exists in the system; this blog will help to give you a head start in setting up your first blog in Movable Type. First Blog comes with some pre-made templates; of course you can edit these templates, or delete them, or do whatever you like with them. But they are a good starting point, and will give you a sense of familiarity with the Movable Type template tags and structure.

To configure the blog for your own purposes, click on the link to First Blog under Your existing blogs, then click on the link to Edit Blog Configuration. Change the name of the blog to whatever you wish to call your blog, and enter a description.

Then, fill in the path and URL information (Local Site Path, Site URL, Local Archive Path, and Archive URL). Values for Local Site Path and Site URL are provided by default, to give you a sense of what the paths should look like; when setting the values of Local Site Path and Local Archive Path, it is best to use absolute paths (paths beginning with a /), rather than relative paths. Note that all four of these fields must be filled in. You should already have created the directories for your blog (above, in Setting up your blog directories). Fill in the local paths (site and archive) with the full paths to those directories. Then enter the appropriate URLs, corresponding to those directories.

Edit any other configuration settings for your blog; when you are done, press SAVE.

That's it! You're now ready to start posting entries to your blog, editing templates, and so on.

ADDITIONAL NOTES

Setting Permissions on Unix

If you are using the Unix shell to set permissions, the syntax for setting file and directory permissions is

$ chmod <number> <files>

The above permissions, then, could be set with

$ chmod 755 *.cgi

To determine the symbolic permissions of a file, you can use ls -l:

$ ls -l *.cgi

The listing for mt.cgi, for example, should look like

-rwxr-xr-x 1 <username> users <size> <date>

Symbolic permissions are read in groups of three (omitting the first character): read/write/execute by the owner of the file; read/write/execute by users in the same group as the owner; read/write/execute by all other users.

Back to installation instructions
Copyright © 2001 Ben Trott and Mena Trott. All Rights Reserved.

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